Blog
See Related Topics arrow

Bus stop victims of pedestrian accident in British Columbia

Waiting at a designated bus stop, whether in an urban or a rural setting, is generally considered a safe space. There is rarely reason to expect bodily harm, as British Columbia commuters embark and disembark, lugging groceries or other items and often accompanied by children. When a vehicle appears, veering dangerously out of control, the danger of a bus rider being the victim of a pedestrian accident suddenly becomes terrifyingly real.

Even less likely is such a scenario playing out in mid-afternoon traffic. Recently in Maple Ridge, striking down a mother and her son was the last of three collisions caused by an out-of-control driver. By that time, RCMP had received several distress calls about a pickup that had backed into a vehicle, jumped a drive-through median and finally crashed into the bus stop.

The male driver is being investigated for impaired driving and has been charged with, among other things, dangerous driving causing bodily harm. Fortunately, the female victim and her son suffered injuries not considered life-threatening. Nevertheless, injuries of any kind may lead to after-effects or symptoms which require ongoing medical attention.

However, with or without after effects, the adult victim may consider what options would be available to her through legal recourse. In such cases where driver fault, whether through impairment or other causes, has led to the bodily injury of an adult and a minor, a personal injury lawyer might provide invaluable insights. A pedestrian accident can occur any number of ways along the roadways of British Columbia. Waiting at a bus stop should not be one of them.

Source: British Columbia - CBC News, "Woman and child injured after truck crashes into bus stop", Tanya Fletcher, Feb. 2, 2018

No Comments

Leave a comment
Comment Information

Get Your Answers Today.

Effective Negotiation And Litigation Services Suited To Your Needs.

Privacy Policy | Business Development Solutions by FindLaw, part of Thomson Reuters.