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A car accident in British Columbia due to conduct unbecoming?

As the old saying goes: courtesy costs nothing. Arguably, the opposite may be proved true when a lack of courtesy on the road causes a car accident. It seems trivial and may even sound trite, but excessive losses reported by the Insurance Corporation of British Columbia (ICBC) are, in part, being attributed to discourteous drivers disrespectful of some of the most basic rules of the road.

According to a former director, cutting off another driver, excessive speeding and yelling at other drivers figure among the reasons that the province holds the nationwide record for poor driving practices. In a survey following a road rage incident that went viral, responses from British Columbia residents showed the highest incidence of bad driving, ranging from rude to dangerous. Even something as common as driving through a stop sign can cause an accident event.

The root of the problem of increased motorway accidents has expanded to include, not just impaired or inattentive driving, but impatience and haste. Any collision involving vehicles or pedestrians can cause injury or, tragically, take lives. A personal injury lawyer, in all such cases, may be most able to assess the cause -- whether born of impatience or impairment -- and determine fault and quantify legal damages.

It may be disingenuous to believe that conduct unbecoming by some British Columbia drivers reflects a diminution of courtesy generally. The truth of that may be debatable and offer food for thought, but the perils of the road are real. Disruptions to life and health, or losing a beloved through a car accident might be usefully addressed by the insights and experience of a personal injury lawyer.

Source: cbc.ca, "Bad manners make bad drivers", Clare Hennig, Feb. 17, 2018

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