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Personal injury lawsuit after crash may cover medical expenses

Drivers on British Columbia roads are responsible for the safety of their passengers. For this reason, no driver should get behind the wheel of an automobile if he or she is under the influence of alcohol, drugs or prescribed medication. The same goes for drivers who know they suffer from medical conditions that could cause emergencies if they fail to manage their illnesses -- else they could be held liable for medical expenses and other financial damages of a passenger injured in a crash.

A man recently lost his life in a rollover crash that officials say might have been caused by a medical condition. Reportedly, the driver lost control when he failed to navigate a sharp corner on the road. The car rolled over several times, and authorities say the impact caused the ejection of a female passenger. Also, the car's engine was recovered about 100 feet from the wrecked car.

The roof of the car had to be cut open to remove the driver's body. The accident investigation is ongoing, and officials could not say whether speed might have played a role. The condition of the woman who was ejected was not reported, nor is it known what her relationship was with the driver.

When a passenger is injured in a car accident, he or she may pursue recovery for medical expenses and other damages sustained in the crash. However, the British Columbia courts base any personal injury lawsuits on negligence by other parties, and only once that is established by appropriate evidence can claims for medical expenses and other damages be considered. This is a complicated process, and is best left to the expertise of a seasoned personal injury lawyer.

Source: vancouversun.com, "One dead, one hurt in Coquitlam crash", Almas Meherally, April 14, 2017

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