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New material could improve the safety of helmets, clothing

Brain injuries can happen at any time when you're involved in an accident. If you're hit by a car while riding your bike, you could hit your head. If you are hit as a passenger in a vehicle, you could be impaled. In any case, it's your right to make a claim for the compensation you need to get the treatment that's right for your condition.

If you've suffered a concussion or other kind of traumatic brain injury from playing a sport, getting into a car accident or riding a bike, then you know that advances in technology can be helpful in preventing future injuries. You may be glad to hear about a new material that is going to be used in helmets around the U.S., because it's been found to reduce brain injuries by dissipating impacts and absorbing hits.

The helmets may be used for sports teams, but the practical uses don't stop there. The helmets could be beneficial for members of the military or others. Funding has recently been provided to Charles Owen Inc., to develop the material, which was recently created by Cardiff University's School of Engineering. The company received $250,000 to advance the materials in helmets for high-impact sports and activities. Now, it will use the money to fund a 12-month project to develop the material further, so it can eventually be implemented for use.

The funding allows the team to test the designs and then print the material with the use of a 3D printer. The 3D printer will use a polymer-based powder to create the material in different shapes and designs suitable for use in the particular application. The material could be used in clothing as well as in helmets and other accessories.

Source: EWS Medical, "Novel material can provide protection against brain injuries," Dec. 17, 2015

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