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4 students killed on international school introductory trip

Traveling to a new country is an exciting thing for students, especially when they want to go to school internationally. Canada and the United States often share exchange students and international university students, because the countries are so close together. Unfortunately, sometimes the trips taken to get from one country to the other can result in catastrophe.

If you've ever lost a loved one in a car or truck accident, then you know the legal difficulties that can take place within your own country; now these families may have to work with their international lawyers to seek compensation for the injuries and deaths that have taken place after a school trip went wrong.

According to the story, the new international college students being introduced to the Seattle area were on a charter bus when a "duck boat" vehicle struck them on a bridge. The charter bus was T-boned by the other vehicle, and other vehicles also collided when they tried to avoid the accident.

In total, 51 people had to be taken to area hospitals. Four of the students on the charter bus were killed; others were left lying in the streets and in the vehicles as they awaited help. The local hospitals reported that two people were in critical condition and 10 were in serious condition at Harborview Medical Center, while three others were in satisfactory condition. Three others were being treated at Northwest Hospital & Medical Center, and two people were placed in intensive care at the University of Washington Medical Center.

There is no known cause for the accident. The National Transportation Safety Board reportedly sent 17 people to review and investigate the accident.

Source: CBC News, "Seattle bus crash: 4 confirmed dead, 12 seriously injured," Sep. 24, 2015

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