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General Motors facing Canadian lawsuits following recalls

General Motors Company recalled 36 million vehicles around the world in 2014, and that includes a number of vehicles in Canada. These vehicles caused accidents and several injuries and fatalities, leading to the recall on a wide scale. What can you do if you were hurt by one of these vehicles? The manufacturer should be held liable for the injuries you've suffered. If you've lost a loved one in a crash resulting from the vehicle defects, then it's important to speak up and join the many others who have done the same.

Statistics from the recall show that the company is going to have to spend around $625 million to compensate the families and victims of crashes that were caused by faulty ignition switches. The number of people killed and eligible for financial compensation due to these faulty ignition switches has been totalled at 124 as of July 2015. There were also a high number of injuries, with 269 people being eligible for compensation.

So far, there are 121 lawsuits being waged against the company in the U.S. and Canada combined. These lawsuits claim that because of the recalls, their vehicles have lost value quickly. There are also another 181 lawsuits in courts in the U.S. and Canada claiming wrongful deaths or injuries were caused by the cars that were recalled.

Canadian safety regulators and other safety authorities are investigating GM over the ignition switch recalls along with other recalls that took place in 2014. In total, 2.6 million vehicles have been recalled and repaired as of July 2015, and it's expected that around 75 percent of these recalls will have their repairs completed by the end of 2015.

Source: Claims Journal, "Facts and Figures: GM's Recall-Related Suits, Costs and Probes," accessed Aug. 20, 2015

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