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Acquired brain injuries in British Columbia

Children and adults in British Columbia are at risk for suffering an acquired brain injury, which often results from some sort of trauma, such as a car accident or fall, an infection or a sudden loss of oxygen to the brain. Depending upon how severe the injuries are, a child who suffers this type of brain injury may be left with permanent physical or mental disabilities.

When a child suffers an acquired brain injury, they are at risk for exhibiting symptoms long after the injury occurred. For example, the injury could impact the child's ability to learn and affect their behavior, their ability to pay attention and their memory. They may also exhibit difficulties in learning how to solve problems. The severity of the injuries and the location of the injuries affect the child's potential disabilities.

There is treatment available for children who suffered an acquired brain injury and their families. The Community Brain Injury Program for Children and Youth, which is located at the BC Centre for Ability, provides rehabilitation programs that help children heal from their acquired brain injury. If the physical and mental injuries are determined to be permanent, special adaptations can be made in order to keep the child in school and give them a positive outlook.

When a child suffers an acquired brain injury in a car accident, their parents may be stuck with expensive medical bills, rehabilitation and the cost of long-term medical care if the injury was severe enough. When it is determined who was at fault, the child's parents may have the grounds to file a personal injury lawsuit against the person who was found to be liable. A lawyer may help with estimating the total cost of damages that were suffered by the child's parents.

Source: British Columbia, "Acquired Brain Injury", December 04, 2014

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