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Bad tires caused car accident that killed 3, report says

A report that was released on July 3 regarding a fatal car accident that occurred in 2012 in British Columbia stated that bad tires played a part in causing the crash. Three individuals from Nanaimo, aged 16, 19 and 30, did not survive the incident.

The accident occurred on Oct. 14, 2012. Authorities stated that a Honda CRV that was carrying the three deceased individuals and two others began to spin before finally colliding with an oncoming pickup truck. The impact from the collision caused the CRV to be cut into two parts. The two passengers who survived the accident were taken to hospital for treatment of their injuries. The three occupants from the pickup truck were also transported to hospital and survived.

The crash may have occurred in part because of wet roads in addition to the poor condition of the CRV's tires. The tires were in such bad condition that attempting to manoeuvre might have caused the vehicle to go into a spin. The CRV's tires were worn past the wear indicators, which means that the tires should have been replaced. Additionally, it was believed that the driver, who had her license for less than a year, might not have had experience with hydroplaning, which was also considered to be a factor in the crash.

Someone who was injured in a car accident may be able to file a personal injury lawsuit against the person who caused the crash, even if the injured person was a passenger in the at-fault driver's vehicle. If the driver did not survive their injuries, the lawsuit may be filed against the person's estate. This may allow the victim to recover his or her accident-related expenses, such as lost or reduced income.

Source: Nanaimo Daily News, "Bad tires partly to blame for fatal crash", Darrell Bellaart, July 05, 2014

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