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ICBC say that young men are more likely to cause accidents

Thousands of people are killed or injured on in traffic accidents each year, and data from the Insurance Corporation of British Columbia indicates that one group of drivers pose a particular threat to other road users. An ICBC representative says that young men are more likely to be involved in car accidents than any other demographic.

Experts say that two factors contribute to the high accident rate for men between the ages of 16 and 20. The first is a lack of experience behind the wheel, which is made more hazardous by increasingly powerful vehicles and highly complex traffic patterns. The second is the confidence and the feeling of immortality that is prevalent among young men.

Little can be done to change automobile design or simplify the driving experience, so experts say that the best way of approaching the problem is through education and awareness. Young men are more prone to dangerous behavior such as speeding, drinking and driving and using mobile devices while behind the wheel, and experts feel that more emphasis should be placed on the possible consequences of these actions.

The ICBC has reported that more than 15,000 people have been hurt or killed in British Columbia traffic accidents each year since 2009, and many of them were victims of negligent or reckless drivers. Accident victims often suffer injuries that cause permanent disability or keep them out of work for long periods, and this could add money problems, anxiety and stress to their already considerable challenges. A personal injury lawyer may seek redress for their physical, emotional and financial suffering by bringing a legal action against the individuals responsible.

Source: News 1130, "Young male drivers most likely to cause a crash in BC: ICBC", Dianne Bankay, May 29, 2014

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